Great Malvern Priory :: Shared Description

Grade I listed.
Great Malvern Priory was originally founded in 1085 by a monk from Worcester. The pillars and arches of the nave are Norman, some of the stones still bear the mason's marks.
The Priory was expanded and redesigned in the 15th century. It began about 1440 in the Perpendicular style. It was consecrated by the Bishop of Worcester in 1460.
At the dissolution the people of Malvern raised the then vast sum of £20 and bought the Priory. Although it escaped damage in the Civil War, it was during the 18th century that the Priory suffered most, and was not until mid Victorian times that the major restoration works started.
The Priory was built to house 30 Benedictine monks, although there were never that many there. At the time of the black death the number was reduced to 10. The cloisters were on the south side of the Priory, but have long since disappeared. There was also once a south transept and Lady chapel which were both destroyed during the dissolution of the monasteries. The 13th century lady chapel was originally built over an existing crypt.
The Priory has two sets of misericords, the earlier group dates from the 14th century and depicts miscellaneous subjects. The second set depicts the labours of the months, and was carved in the 15th century. There is also a collection of mediaeval tiles dating from 1453. About 100 different designs survive.
The sanctuary contains an effigy of the 13th century knight and also an Elizabethan monument to John Knotsford and his wife. There are several stained-glass windows with mediaeval glass.
Charles Darwin's daughter is buried in the churchyard. She died aged 10 probably of tuberculosis.
There is a fine four manual organ by Nicholson.
by Julian P Guffogg
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58 images use this description. Preview sample shown below:

SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory by Philip Halling
SO7745 : Misericord, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Detail, West Window, Great Malvern Priory by J.Hannan-Briggs
SO7745 : Monks' Stalls, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Medieval stained glass window, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: Two memorials by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Misericord, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: Millennium window (2) by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : The nave, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Millennium Window (east), Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : West Window, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Prince Arthur from Magnificat window, Great Malvern Priory by J.Hannan-Briggs
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: Altar and Reredos by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: The Nave Ceiling by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Misericord, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: the west end by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Great malvern Priory: The East end by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Detail, medieval stained glass, Great Malvern Priory by J.Hannan-Briggs
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: Under the tower by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: round headed arches by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: wired for sound by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Great Malvern Priory: War Memorial (for World War II) by Bob Harvey
SO7745 : Detail, Great East Window, Great Malvern Priory by J.Hannan-Briggs
SO7745 : The Great East Window, Great Malvern Priory by Julian P Guffogg

... and 33 more images.

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Created: Thu, 16 Aug 2012, Updated: Thu, 16 Aug 2012

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2012 Julian P Guffogg, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.