Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby :: Shared Description

Grade I listed

The Domesday Survey records a church on this site in 1086 in the possession of Gilbert of Ghent the wealthiest landowner on the county at that time.
The present church dates from the twelfth century onwards and consists of a western tower, nave with north and south aisles, chancel, and south porch.
The west end of the church is probably the oldest part dating from 12th or early 13th century with walls made of rubble which is 8ft thick in places. The South aisle once extended to embrace the tower but this section was demolished. Most of the church was constructed in 1320 with the nave, south aisle chancel and porch being rebuilt at this time.
The western tower is from the thirteenth century and is of three stages with a plain parapet. The belfry stage has fourteenth century windows.
The south porch, dating from the fourteenth century has arcading above the side benches with ogee headed panels.
The nave has four bay arcades with thirteenth century octagonal piers. At the east end of the south aisle there is a door which once led to the rood loft. Only the lower portion of the rood screen remains at Osbournby.
There is one modern stained-glass window to the north wall.
The chancel has a fine fourteenth century sedilia with ogee arched heads and Crocketts with human head stops. There is also a piscina and aumbry.

The nave has a number of good fourteenth century bench ends with various subjects including Adam and Eve, and St George and the Dragon.
There is a twelfth century tub font with intersecting blank arcading, presumably from an earlier church.
At the south west end of the nave there are commandment boards.
There is a small organ by Harston of Newark, circa 1890.
The church was restored in 1873 by Charles Kirk when the roof was replaced and the east window and pews were installed (cost £1,460).
In 1965 the tower was found to be dangerously cracked and bulging and had to be strengthened. The clock which was removed from the tower face dates from 1740 and now resides in the North Aisle.
by Julian P Guffogg
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8 images use this description:

TF0638 : Carved bench end, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Stained glass window, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Interior, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Interior view from the south aisle, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Carved bench end, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Commandment Boards, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg
TF0638 : Poppy head, Ss Peter & Paul church, Osbournby by Julian P Guffogg


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Created: Tue, 5 Mar 2019, Updated: Tue, 5 Mar 2019

The 'Shared Description' text on this page is Copyright 2019 Julian P Guffogg, however it is specifically licensed so that contributors can reuse it on their own images without restriction.