ST5590 : Building the Severn Bridge 1963

taken 59 years ago, near to Beachley, Gloucestershire, Great Britain

Building the Severn Bridge  1963
Building the Severn Bridge 1963
Early stages of the construction of the western tower at Beachley. Note the use of Scotch Derrick type cranes.
The Severn Crossing

Severn Crossing is a term used to refer to the two motorway crossings over the River Severn estuary between England and Wales. The two crossings are:

The Severn Bridge (Welsh: Pont Hafren)
The Second Severn Crossing (Welsh: Ail Groesfan Hafren)

The first motorway suspension bridge was inaugurated on 8 September 1966, and the newer cable-stayed bridge, a few miles to the south, was inaugurated on 5 June 1996. The Second Severn Crossing marks the upper limit of the Severn Estuary. From 1966 to 1996, the bridge carried the M4 motorway. On completion of the Second Severn crossing the motorway from Aust on the English side to Chepstow was renamed the M48.

The two Severn crossings are regarded as the main crossing points from England into South Wales. Prior to 1966 road traffic between the southern counties of Wales and the southern counties of England either had to travel via Gloucester or take the Aust Ferry, which ran roughly along the line of the Severn Bridge, from Old Passage near Aust to Beachley. The ferry ramps at Old Passage and Beachley are still visible.

Tolls are collected on both crossings from vehicles travelling in a westward direction only. As of January 2012, the toll for small vehicles is 6.20. The Old Severn Bridge is Grade I listed.

River Severn

The River Severn is the longest river in the United Kingdom, at about 220 miles. It rises at an altitude of 610 metres on Plynlimon, in the Cambrian Mountains of mid Wales. It then flows through Shropshire, Worcestershire and Gloucestershire, with the county towns of Shrewsbury, Worcester, and Gloucester on its banks.
The river is usually considered to become the Severn Estuary after the Second Severn Crossing between Severn Beach, South Gloucestershire and Sudbrook, Monmouthshire. The river then discharges into the Bristol Channel.

Listed Buildings and Structures

Listed buildings and structures are officially designated as being of special architectural, historical or cultural significance. There are over half a million listed structures in the United Kingdom, covered by around 375,000 listings.
Listed status is more commonly associated with buildings or groups of buildings, however it can cover many other structures, including bridges, headstones, steps, ponds, monuments, walls, phone boxes, wrecks, parks, and heritage sites, and in more recent times a road crossing (Abbey Road) and graffiti art (Banksy 'Spy-booth') have been included.

In England and Wales there are three main listing designations;
Grade I (2.5%) - exceptional interest, sometimes considered to be internationally important.
Grade II* (5.5%) - particularly important buildings of more than special interest.
Grade II (92%) - nationally important and of special interest.

There are also locally listed structures (at the discretion of local authorities) using A, B and C designations.

In Scotland three classifications are also used but the criteria are different. There are around 47,500 Listed buildings.
Category A (8%)- generally equivalent to Grade I and II* in England and Wales
Category B (51%)- this appears generally to cover the ground of Grade II, recognising national importance.
Category C (41%)- buildings of local importance, probably with some overlap with English Grade II.

In Northern Ireland the criteria are similar to Scotland, but the classifications are:
Grade A (2.3%)
Grade B+ (4.7%)
Grade B (93%)

Read more at Wikipedia LinkExternal link

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ST5590, 194 images   (more nearby search)
Photographer
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Date Taken
10 March 1963   (more nearby)
Submitted
Wednesday, 6 May, 2020
Geographical Context
Rivers, Streams, Drainage  Roads, Road transport  Construction, Development 
River (from Tags)
River Severn 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! ST 5536 9057 [10m precision]
WGS84: 51:36.7308N 2:38.7644W
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! ST 5522 9070
View Direction
Southeast (about 135 degrees)
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Other Tags
Severn Road Bridge  Bridge Tower 

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