NT1280 : The Forth Road Bridge

taken 2 years ago, near to Forth Road Bridge, Edinburgh, Great Britain

This is 1 of 14 images, with title The Forth Road Bridge in this square
The Forth Road Bridge
The Forth Road Bridge
The base of the north suspension tower.
Leaving Rosyth for Bergen :: NT0982

The first hour of a journey from Rosyth to Bergen, with spectacular views of the three bridges over the Firth of Forth catching late afternoon sunshine.

The Forth Road Bridge :: NT1279

The bridge, opened in 1964, spans the Firth of Forth; connecting the capital city Edinburgh, at South Queensferry, to Fife, at North Queensferry. The bridge replaced a centuries-old ferry service to carry vehicular traffic, cyclists, and pedestrians across the Forth.

When opened, on 4 September 1964 by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, the Forth Road Bridge was the largest suspension bridge in Europe, and, together with the approach viaducts is over 1˝ miles long. The bridge has a spectacular central span of over 3300 ft. between its two main towers. The side spans, which carry the deck to the side towers, are each 1340 ft. long and are flanked by approach viaducts.

On 3 April 2001 the Forth Road Bridge was listed as a category 'A' building.

The Forth Bridges Visitor Centre Trust charity (from where much of the above information was gathered) was wound up in April 2012 LinkExternal link .

Other useful links are:
Forth Bridges Visitor Information LinkExternal link and
Wikipedia entry LinkExternal link

The Forth Bridge :: NT1379

The 1˝ mile Forth Bridge was the world’s first major steel bridge. It was begun in 1883 and formally completed on 4 March 1890 when HRH Edward Prince of Wales tapped into place a ‘golden’ rivet.

It is often incorrectly called the Forth Rail Bridge or Forth Railway Bridge to distinguish it from the nearby Forth Road Bridge which was opened in 1964. The rail bridge connects Edinburgh with Fife, and acts as a major artery connecting the north-east and south-east of the country. The bridge is a category A listed building (LB9977 LinkExternal link Historic Environment Scotland).

Painting the Forth Bridge became a metaphor for a never-ending task, because a team of painters took three years to paint it all, by which time the first bits they had done needed to be re-done, so they started all over again. More advanced and longer-lasting paints now make this unnecessary.

Alfred Hitchcock's 1935 film The 39 Steps includes a scene on the bridge and it is featured even more prominently in the 1959 remake of the same film, although there is no reference to the bridge in the original novel by John Buchan upon which the films are based.

LinkExternal link Forth Bridges Visitor Centre Trust
LinkExternal link Wikipedia entry

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NT1280, 272 images   (more nearby search)
Photographer
  (find more nearby)
Date Taken
Thursday, 25 July, 2019   (more nearby)
Submitted
Thursday, 1 August, 2019
Geographical Context
Coastal  Village, Rural settlement  Roads, Road transport  Railways  Estuary, Marine 
Place (from Tags)
Firth of Forth  North Queensferry  Fife 
Primary Subject of Photo
Bridge 
Subject Location
OSGB36: geotagged! NT 1256 8010 [10m precision]
WGS84: 56:0.3501N 3:24.2284W
Camera Location
OSGB36: geotagged! NT 1248 8006
View Direction
East-northeast (about 67 degrees)
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Other Tags
Suspension Bridge  Coast  Forth Bridge  Forth Road Bridge 

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Image Type (about): close look 
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