WW1 Great War Centenary - Manufacturing in Wolverhampton

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Clyno


The Stevens brothers Fort Works engine factory was sold to the Clyno company in 1910 when they relocated from Northamptonshire and the Ashes Works was purchased two years later. The company were motorcycle manufacturers.

During the First World War Clyno Engineering Ltd made aero engines and parts, air rangefinders, mine parts, shrapnel sockets, fuze plugs. The firm primarily supplied motorcycles and sidecars, the Vickers-Clyno machine gun motorcycle outfit and solo motorcycles to the Army. A large order of the sidecar outfits were also provided to the Russian Army. Of the 660 employees 250 were women.

The company struggled after the war as the market was flooded with ex-Army vehicles and the new Russian Government reneged on agreements to pay for the motorcycle outfits. The company folded in 1922.

The two works buildings are planned to be demolished to make way for housing regeneration of the area.

SO9098 : Fort Works - Pelham Street by John M
The Stevens brothers engine factory was sold to the Clyno company in 1910 when they re-located from Northamptonshire. Clyno manufactured motorcycles here until 1920 when the company was liquidated. A new company with the Clyno name was formed specialising in motor cars. In the early 1920s it was the third largest car manufacturer after Austin and Morris. The company finances were overextended by building a new factory. Product quality suffered and a number of poor decisions resulted in the company's closure in September 1929.
by John M



SO9098 : Ashes Works - Pelham Street by John M
The Ashes Works were acquired by Clyno shortly after they moved to Wolverhampton in 1910 and is across the street from their Fort Works. Clyno manufactured motorcycles here until 1920 when the company was liquidated. A new company with the Clyno name was formed specialising in motor cars. In the early 1920s it was the third largest car manufacturer after Austin and Morris. The company finances were overextended by building a new factory. Product quality suffered and a number of poor decisions resulted in the company's closure in September 1929.
by John M


KML
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